Firewalling

A firewall is a network security system that controls the incoming and outgoing network traffic based on an applied rule set. A firewall establishes a barrier between a trusted, secure internal network and another network (e.g., the Internet) that is assumed not to be secure and trusted. Firewalls exist both as software to run on general purpose hardware and as a hardware appliance. Many hardware-based firewalls also offer other functionality to the internal network they protect, such as acting as a DHCP server for that network.

There are different types of firewalls depending on where the communication is taking place, where the communication is intercepted and the state that is being traced.

Network layer or packet filters
Network layer firewalls, also called packet filters, operate at a relatively low level of the TCP/IP protocol stack, not allowing packets to pass through the firewall unless they match the established rule set. The firewall administrator may define the rules; or default rules may apply. The term "packet filter" originated in the context of BSD operating systems.

Application layer firewall
Application-layer firewalls work on the application level of the TCP/IP stack (i.e., all browser traffic, or all telnet or ftp traffic), and may intercept all packets traveling to or from an application. They block other packets (usually dropping them without acknowledgment to the sender).

On inspecting all packets for improper content, firewalls can restrict or prevent outright the spread of networked computer worms and trojans. The additional inspection criteria can add extra latency to the forwarding of packets to their destination.

Proxy server
A proxy server (running either on dedicated hardware or as software on a general-purpose machine) may act as a firewall by responding to input packets (connection requests, for example) in the manner of an application, while blocking other packets. A proxy server is a gateway from one network to another for a specific network application, in the sense that it functions as a proxy on behalf of the network user

Network address translation (NAT)
Firewalls often have network address translation (NAT) functionality, and the hosts protected behind a firewall commonly have addresses in the "private address range". Firewalls often have such functionality to hide the true address of protected hosts. Hiding the addresses of protected devices has become an increasingly important defense against network reconnaissance.

Cameo Global is a specialist in network security and firewall issues. As a Proud Partner of Cisco Systems, Juniper Networks, Checkpoint Security and Trend Micro, Cameo is capable of supporting you with the best Security and Firewalling Solutions.

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Do you want to know more about our Firewalling solutions? Then please don't hesitate to contact us with our online contactform or email us through emea-sales@cameoglobal.com. Or call one of our country offices.

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